Into the Dreaming Imaginative Fiction from Author, Reviewer, and Writing Coach Christine Amsden

Tag Archives: Suspense

Finish the Story Grand Opening Special: FREE First Chapter Edit

This week is the Grand Opening of Finish the Story.

I’ll be working alongside Claire Ashgrove and Dennis Young, two fantastic fellow authors/editors, to offer a greater variety of services than I could on my own. We are a full-service editing company, which means we strive to help you prepare for publication no matter where you are in the process. We include services such as book fixing, for books that need a little doctoring before they’re ready for editing, and formatting, for authors who are ready to publish. Our package rates bundle services to keep the costs down, and give you access to more than one editor through the different phases of editing to ensure that your finished product is as error-free as possible.

All genres of fiction welcome! Non-fiction and memoirs welcome!

Give us a try! Now through the end of March, send us your first chapter (up to 5,000 words) and get a FREE, no-obligation developmental-style edit.

Learn more at Finish the Story

Book Review: Total Surrender

Total Surrender (Sin Brothers, #4)After three amazing books in this series, what a disappointment!

So if you’ve been reading this series, you know the setup. The Sin brothers were created in a lab to be raised as soldiers. They have special abilities. They kick ass. They escaped five years ago and ever since then have been searching for a way to disable the kill chips embedded near their spines. They’ve been searching frantically for three books now and the clock is ticking.

SEVEN DAYS TO GO…

Jory is in a cell. Piper is a computer hacker trying to disable his kill chip. Why is it so much trouble? Apparently, when he was shot, one of the bullets nicked the chip and now it won’t respond to wireless communications. Great start!

But it didn’t take long at all for the problems to begin. Most notably, the chemistry between Jory and Piper was way off. In the other three books I felt it right away, but for these two it simply wasn’t working. Part of this might have been situational. Jory was locked in a cell, using “psychological tricks” to get Piper’s cooperation. (I put that in quotes because I wasn’t convinced by them.) Piper, meanwhile, was convinced Jory was a traitor to her country AND at the same time she was desperate to gain the love and respect of her father — the commander.

TIMING

The biggest problem with this book was timing. With seven days left to live, I felt that the tone of the book was not nearly immediate enough. It got worse when we started counting down the hours. They kept talking when it was time to act, and having sex when it was time to act… and I couldn’t get into it.

The timing was off in another sense too. Piper had to choose between her father and Jory in this book, something that could have been a terrific conflict in another situation but here I struggled with it. She spent the first half of the book waffling, during which time I had trouble buying any romantic attraction on her part. She just wasn’t in the right place, emotionally speaking. I think this is a big reason that the chemistry was off, and the reason why she rubbed me the wrong way. She wasn’t unlikeable, exactly, she just didn’t seem like the right girl for Jory at the right time.

The attraction between these two was so poorly timed that I skipped the sex scenes!

OTHER PROBLEMS

There was a plot twist late in the book that I found both implausible and utterly unnecessary. It never went anywhere.

Piper had a boyfriend at the start of this book who turned out to be a distraction in a book where there was already too much being packed in a short space of time.

The sappiness in this volume got to me more than in the other books. Not sure if there was more of it or if it came down to another timing problem — ie “Will you shut up about how much you love one another already and work on not dying?”

REDEEMING QUALITIES

There was another plot twist relatively early on that I loved and that could paves the way for more books in this world. This was probably the #1 thing that kept me reading to the end.

CONCLUSION

I’m not giving up on this author. Despite the rocky conclusion, this series remains an excellent example of steamy military suspense and I would totally recommend it. Prolific authors are bound to have a dud now and again. Plus, it’s always possible that the chemistry issues between Jory and Piper were my own problem. (I did my best to explain them so you could decide if they’ll be a problem for you.)

Book Review: Blind Faith

Blind Faith (Sin Brothers, #3)This series just doesn’t quit! I can’t remember the last time I got so hooked. I can’t even say that the books are super unique … to tell you the truth, I saw almost every twist coming. But I didn’t care because I so enjoyed the ride. This book was like chocolate … you just want to eat it up. And sure, there’s Creme Brulee and sometimes that’s good too, but for pure comfort, you can’t beat chocolate.

That’s what this series is for me…chocolate. Really good quality chocolate.

Nate and Audrey’s story was just as good as the first two. The four brothers are still in danger, there’s a chip that’s going to explode in a couple of weeks and they’re youngest brother is missing. I cannot wait for the final book in this series! I almost cried when I saw it wouldn’t come out until march!

I highly recommend.

Book Review: Sweet Revenge

Sweet Revenge (Sin Brothers, #2)As soon as I finished the first book in this series I dashed off to read #2 (hence the reason my review of #1 was so short 🙂 )and it was just as good! This time it’s the oldest of the four brothers, Matt, who finds a soft, sweet girl to love.

The four Dean brothers were created in a lab and raised to be killers. They escaped as adults, wanting nothing more than family and a normal life. But they have a kill switch implanted near their spine that is a ticking time bomb waiting to go off. Plus, they still don’t know what happened to the youngest of them, Jory.

I am really enjoying how each of these stories can stand on its own and yet at the same time it builds the bigger story arc. For that reason, I would recommend reading in order.

These books are fast-paced, fun, and steamy. The author has captured the perfect man and pretty much duplicated him four times — he’s strong, capable, loyal, ruthlessly protective, and dominant. If that’s the kind of romantic hero you like, this series is definitely for you!

Book Review: Forgotten Sins

Forgotten Sins (Sin Brothers, #1)
I loved this book! I read it all in one go. I could not put it down. It was fun, adventurous, suspenseful, and the romance was steamy! And okay, so an enhanced soldier waking up with amnesia isn’t the most original idea in the world, but I honestly didn’t care. This story was fast-paced and well-written. I immediately connected to the characters and can’t wait for more. I highly recommend!

Book Review: Sin Brothers Series by Rebecca Zanetti

Forgotten Sins (Sin Brothers, #1)I may as well review the first three books in this series together because that’s how I read them — together! I picked up the first book and couldn’t put it down. The series … not just the one book! When I finished the third book and saw that #4 wasn’t ready yet I practically mourned my need to wait.

The books are: Forgotten Sins, Sweet Revenge, and Blind Faith. Together, they introduce us to the Sin Brothers, four (well three, more on that latter) brothers who were created artificially and trained brutally to be part of an enhanced soldier program. Eventually, the brothers escape and begin planning revenge on the people who hurt/used them.

Sweet Revenge (Sin Brothers, #2)Sound familiar? Okay, okay! I didn’t say it was original. Just addictive. This series is like really good chocolate. Nothing fancy, but oh how sweet!

The first book begins with Shane, who can’t remember who he is. (No, don’t put it down yet! It’s okay.) His wife is called in to identify him and take care of him … except, his wife hasn’t seen him in two years and is pretty ticked off at him for running out on her without a word of explanation. She was just about to file divorce papers when he shows up, and it is her greatest desire to have him sign them.

Things don’t go according to plan. Shane doesn’t want a divorce, and there’s someone trying to kill him — or her. They’re not sure. Plus at some point he begins regaining bits of memory. That’s when his brothers swoop in.

These books have a high steam rating … so be prepared! There’s also plenty of action, adventure, and mystery. I found the mystery to be a bit predictable. I guessed at the endings most of the time, especially after the first book. But some books are predictable in an “I really couldn’t care less now that I’ve figured it out” way and other books are predictable in a “I’m still enjoying the ride” way. These books definitely fell in the latter category.

Blind Faith (Sin Brothers, #3)The best thing about these books was the brothers themselves. Each one was super good looking of course, but more than that — smart, strong, capable, and enhanced. They had super hearing, among other things. And underneath the rough exterior was a marshmallow heart. Each book begins with a prologue that shows the brothers as kids, just trying to survive in their harsh environment with nothing but one another for support. As adults they want a family more than anything else, and I wanted to read about them getting it.

Each book focuses on one brothers … Shane, Matthew, and Nate. The last book will focus on the missing brother, the one who disappeared two years ago and who they fear is dead. (That’s not a spoiler, it’s pretty obvious from the first book.) They also have another problem they are struggling to work through. They’re going to die soon if they don’t get these chips implanted near their spines disabled.

I can’t wait to see how this ends!

I highly recommend this series to readers who enjoy steamy romantic suspense with a mild scifi/fantasy twist.

The Implicit Promise of Genre

Have you ever read a book or a story in which, halfway through, there’s suddenly a ghost? There you are, reading what you think is a perfectly ordinary, mainstream suspense, mystery, or romance, when suddenly Boo! Out pops a random spirit. You may think this is far-fetched, but I’ve seen it in books written by bestselling authors. And far from the ghosts frightening me, they typically make me cast a book down in disgust.

I love fantasy. You know I love fantasy. I’ve spent the past few years of my life immersed in the genre as I wrote Cassie Scot and her sequels. But loving fantasy does not mean I want to see it everywhere. I want to read a fantasy if, and only if, the implicit promise of the book involves magic or the paranormal.

What’s an implicit promise, you ask? Well, an implicit promise is the promise an author makes during the setup of a story, in which we are given to understand more or less what the story is about. Hero stumbles over dead body, gets accused of the crime, and has to figure out who did it so he won’t go to jail — mystery! Lonely young woman meets handsome young man and sparks (figuratively) fly — romance!  Queen of the fae comes to strike a bargain with our protagonists — fantasy!

Yes, that is a rather pat description. No, I don’t expect everyone’s creativity to fit neatly into a box. Maybe in that mystery a ghost killed the guy. I’m not telling you that if you don’t show us something paranormal in chapter one, you can’t go there, but if you do, it has to be with that implicit promise in mind. Normal guy. Normal world. Normal mystery. You have to give us clues. You have to foreshadow. You have to tell the story in such a way that when the ghost does appear, we may or may not be expecting it, but we can think, “Ohhhh! Now I see where you were going when he kept finding all his stuff had been moved around in an apparently locked room.”

If you do decide you want to do that, know it’s tough, and some people still won’t like it because they’ll feel cheated out of their implicit promise.

But most of all, magic isn’t a solution to every problem. That’s not what it is in true fantasy and it DEFINITELY shouldn’t be what it is in stories that are supposedly (and initially) set in the real world.

Book Feature: Don’t Let the Wind

I’m pleased to share the latest from Aaron Paul Lazar with you, a talented author with a large and growing repertoire of books. Aaron is a fellow Twilight Times author and has become a friend of mine over recent months. I only read my first book by him earlier this summer, but I am excited to know there are many more — both in his backlog and being released TODAY!

Don't Let the Wind Catch You

When young Gus LeGarde befriends Tully, a cranky old hermit in the woods who speaks to an Indian spirit, he wonders if the man is nuts. But when the spirit rattles tin cups, draws on dusty mirrors, and flips book pages, pestering him to find evidence to avenge her past, things change fast. What Gus doesn’t understand is why his mother hates Tully and forbids him to see the old man. What could Tully have possibly done to earn this distrust?


Faced with long-buried family secrets and danger, Gus summons courage beyond his years in this poignant and powerful telling of the sultry summer of 1965.

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Author Photo July 2013

Interview with Aaron Paul Lazar

Q) How was writing Don’t Let the Wind Catch You different from the other books in the LeGarde Mystery series?

A) When I write from “young Gus’s” POV, I need to let myself go back to that eleven or twelve-year-old inside me. It was an age I remember with great clarity and with intense nostalgia. I simply try to be me (or Gus) at that age and let the story flow. Sometimes I have to look up when certain songs or events took place, because I don’t remember the precise year they came out, etc. And of course I’d already created the characters of young Gus, Siegfried, and Elsbeth in Tremolo: cry of the loon, so it wasn’t hard at all. It can be almost like a magical trip back to childhood for me, which is probably why these types of books are among my favorites.

Q) Where does the German influence come from? Brigit Marggrander, the twins’ mother, has a real problem dealing with her past life in a Nazi concentration camp. How did this come into your story?

A) When I worked for Kodak I lived in Germany for months and visited frequently, thus my passion for German culture. And my daughter, Melanie, performed in “The Diary of Anne Frank” when she was in high school. I’d sit in the back of the auditorium during rehearsals and as time went on my hatred for the Nazis deepened. So I had to include some kind of theme here for my German twins’ mother. Also, I have always been fascinated by stories about asylums, especially in the older days. I realize that in the fifties and sixties mental illness was often considered an embarrassment, and people frequently went years without help like Brigit does in this side-plot of Don’t Let the Wind Catch You.

Q) Will you ever write a story that shows what happened to Siegfried in 1966? (The boating accident that made him lose his math genius and left him partially mentally impaired)

A) I do plan to write a sequel to Don’t Let the Wind Catch You, and it would make sense for it to take place the next year, in 1966. So stay tuned!

Q) How hard is it to take a fully mature adult character and portray him as a child? You did this with Gus LeGarde, Siegfried, Elsbeth, and also made Gus’s parents, The Marggranders, Oscar and Millie Stone, and the LeGarde grandparents thirty years younger in these “young Gus” stories.

A) It was actually a lot of fun to take the “adult” part away from my main characters who started in Double Forté (book 1 in the series) and bring them back to 1964. (Tremolo) I decided to show Siegfried, the gentle giant in Double Forté who lost his mental acuity, before his accident. It was fun to portray him as a bright, math genius who also excelled in orienteering. Bits of Siegfried transcend across time, of course, and can be found in the pre-accident young boy as well as the mature adult who works in Freddie’s veterinary clinic and around the LeGarde homestead.

Q) Where did you learn so much about horses? It seems like you really know the details. Research? Or first hand experience?

A) Ah, my horse chapters are among my favorites, mostly because I miss my own Morgan horses my wife Dale and I used to ride every day. We were both horse fanatics—one of the reasons we bonded so well before we were married. We talked horses all day long, cared for, rode, bought, and sold them. But mostly we adored them. When we were married, Dale brought her little Morgan mare out to live with us in Upstate New York, and I purchased my first sixteen hand high Morgan gelding. Oh, the rides we had. It was Heaven. As a child I also rode the woods with my buddies. But we never met up with a hermit or a little Indian ghost!

Q) You cover a difficult subject in this book with great sensitivity. Were you trying to teach a lesson in anti-bigotry here by “showing, not telling” how Gus reacts to the discovery that his grandfather loved another man?

A) I didn’t plan to do this – it just came about. I wanted to have a scandalous secret that was revealed over time, and it just happened to involve a gay couple who sadly had to give up their love because of the morés of the time. In hindsight, I think Gus’s reaction to this “taboo” subject was authentic. He hadn’t been tainted by discussion of homosexuality being an “illness” or that it was wrong. People didn’t discuss such things in those days, not openly, and especially not with children. I grew up when Gus did and never even heard about gay people until I was in college. So I’m proud of Gus for his understanding and compassion, and glad that maybe in hindsight he can help folks young or old learn to accept people who don’t fit into a supposedly “normal” mold. I realize, also in hindsight, that I have included mini-lessons in all my books about accepting those people who aren’t perfect, like Siegfried (mentally damage) or Cindi (Downs Syndrome, from Upstaged), or Penelope (gay lover of Sam Moore’s daughter in For Keeps), or Raoul Rodriguez (transgender in For the Birds) or Slim (Huge black convict in FireSong), etc.
About the Writing Process
(selections from an original interview by Marcia Applegate, journalist)

Q) Why did you choose mysteries? Was it an easy choice, or did you have to make a conscious decision?

A) I always read mysteries, since I was a kid. I used to read Hardy Boys, Agatha Christie, and all the “animal” mysteries I could get my parents to buy on the Arrow Book Club in elementary school. I remember reading about Black Diamond (a horse) and lots of dog stories. My folks read and adored John D. MacDonald and I, in turn, fell in love with the Travis McGee mysteries of the master, Mr. MacDonald. They also had Rex Stout, Agatha Christie, PD James, and more mysteries always available in plentiful quantities. I guess it was genetics. I was born to two mystery fanatics. So I really didn’t depart from the genre. When I began writing, it was almost a defacto decision to create a mystery.

Q) Do you enjoy writing?

A) I love the process of writing. It’s as if I’m living in the movie in my mind. It’s a fantastic escape mechanism and I crave the process like a drug addict. Lately I’ve had to do more promotional efforts and I must say, I don’t enjoy that as much as the pure process of creating!

Q) Do you write in a specific place or time of day? Do you keep a notebook to jot down ideas?

A) I write mostly in the early morning hours or the later, quieter moments of the day. But I can write anytime, anywhere. I have been known to write some great scenes in a hospital, waiting for family to come out of surgery, or in the airport, waiting for a plane to Germany. It seems whenever I have a moment to myself, it is the “perfect” time to write. Although I must say my favorite time to write is the dark, early hours of morning.
I don’t keep a notebook, but there is a file I have on my computer with “ideas for stories” that I occasionally refer to. Usually I have an idea brewing for one particular story that seems to overpower me. I think about it constantly. I dream about it. And then the new book begins to take shape. That’s my typical process.

Q) Do you know the end of a novel when you begin? Do you ever change your planned plot in midstream?

A) I don’t always know the endings in advance. I usually know the beginning and the general themes I will use. I start to write and let my characters take over, then as the themes deepen and become more complex, the ending seems to fall into place. If you’ve read my works, you’ll know I usually like to end my stories in an upbeat, positive fashion. People still die, someone is still hurt, but in the end, the stories resolve to a positive outcome.

Q) Do you discuss your work with family or friends?

A) I used to drive my wife crazy, asking her about what Gus LeGarde (my first protagonist in LeGarde Mysteries) would do, or what she thought of one plot twist or another. Lately, however, I’ve been giving her a break. I think I used to drive her mad! These days, I sometimes run my plot ideas by my wonderful mentor, Sonya Bateman, who is a superb writer and a great teacher. She’s shared so much with me over the years and I know my writing has improved dramatically because of her influence.

Q) The Genesee Valley is almost a character in your novels. Have you always lived there?

A) I moved to the Genesee Valley in upstate NY (just south of Rochester, NY) in 1981, the same year I married Dale and the year I started working for Kodak. Two years later, we had our first of three daughters, and we have lived here and loved it ever since. I can’t think of another place on earth I’d rather spend my days, it is so beautiful, with the rolling hills and the Finger Lakes.
Characterization

Q) Does a character change as you build his or her part in the story?

A) I do believe in achieving what they call “character arcs” in general, although I never start out a book thinking, “how can I make Sam Moore grow and change based on the circumstances?” It just seems to happen naturally as the stories unfold. But I hope my characters grow based on their challenges and traumas. How could they not?

Q)Are your characters skeletons when you begin writing or they fully fleshed out?

A) In the very beginning, when I start a series, my characters are pretty well fleshed-out, with back-stories that are intriguing and sad or difficult in some aspects. For example, Sam Moore starts out in Healey’s Cave (book 1 in Moore Mysteries, otherwise known as the Green Marble Mysteries) as a man in torment. He has been missing and mourning the disappearance of his little brother for fifty years. No one knows what happened to Billy, whether he’s dead or alive, and it tortures Sam every day of his life. There’s a long period of distinct history, and he often thinks back to it, including in some flashback scenes. I think when I began each of my three series (LeGarde, Moore, and Tall Pines) I played around a bit with the characters to develop them. Gus LeGarde started out being a testimony to my father, who was much like him. Then as time went on and I edited and refined Double Forte’ (book 1 in LeGarde Mysteries), I ended up dispersing a lot of “me” into the character. Of course, I was writing in the first person and I actually am a great deal like my father was, so it was kind of a natural outcome. In time, Gus LeGarde ended up being an amalgam of my father, me, and his own persona.

Q) Do you have a favorite in each book (other than the hero or protagonist)?

A) In Moore Mysteries, I’ve started to fall in love with Sam’s daughter’s lover, Penelope. She is a gay, prescient doctor of Native American descent who really fascinates me. I think I’ll have to feature her in the next book in Moore Mysteries. In other books I would say, yes, I have “special” feelings for certain characters who crop up – sometimes they are featured characters and sometimes they fill the main cast. In LeGarde Mysteries, my favorite has always been Siegfried, my “gentle giant.” In Tall Pines Mysteries, my favorites are Quinn and Callie.

Q) Have you created characters so attractive that you hate to kill them off and miss them when they’re gone from the book?

A) Absolutely! First of all, I adore Billy, Sam Moore’s little brother who died at age 11 in Healey’s Cave, and who still comes into play in the rest of the series. Although he’s dead, he still is influential in the series. In LeGarde Mysteries, it was very difficult to kill off Elsbeth, the sweet and fiery wife of Gus LeGarde. I had the chance to bring her “back” so to speak in the prequel to Double Forte’ (where she’s already been dead for four years) in Tremolo: cry of the loon. It was nice to get to “see” her alive and active as an eleven-year-old in this lakeside summer prequel that takes place in 1964 in the Maine lakes region.

Q) Are there some characters you find yourself disliking, even though you may not have intended that?

A) There are some characters who frustrate me, like Freddie (Gus LeGarde’s daughter) in Double Forté. It takes her a long time to reject her philandering husband, Harold. I hate that she tolerates his abuse for so long. Most of the time, however, I feel deep and strong connections to all my characters, whether they are heroes or villains, straight or gay, powerful or weak. They are all so “real” to me that I probably could be committed tomorrow based on my feelings toward this parallel universe.

Q) Do you find it difficult to create an attractive, likeable but truly villainous villain?

A) Maybe it’s time for me to actually do this. So far my villains have been understandable but really nasty. Sort of like operatic characters. I think my next challenge will be to create a likable bad guy. ;o)
My colleague Sonya Bateman does this so well, I always admire the fact that she’ll get me hating and fearing her villain in the beginning, but feeling a camaraderie and sympathy for him in the end of the story.

Q) How much of real people do you put into characters? Could they recognize themselves or do you mix and match?

A) If they were still alive, these characters would be quite outraged, or terribly complimented. Most of the people who appear in my books have passed away, like my grandparents or my father. The rest are admittedly often based on my wife and my grandchildren. I love them all and can’t help but include scenes from our lives or aspects that are poignant and meaningful to the stories. Parts of my wife were the inspiration for Camille Coté, Elsbeth Marggrander, and Rachel Moore, in various aspects. My grandmother Coté was the inspiration for Maddy Coté in LeGarde Mysteries. My two maternal grandparents were the models for Oscar and Millie Stone, in the same series. The other characters, however, are completely imaginary.
Plotting

Q) What kinds of research have you done regarding paranormal happenings?

A) I hate to admit it, but most everything I include in my books stems either from my own experience or my mad imaginings. Of course, I can’t help but be influenced subliminally by movies and books. So I’m sure the paranormal aspects (like time travel) are influenced by movies such as Frequency or Lightning. If you read my favorite list of movies, you will see themes that are often prevalent in my books, such as unrequited love, an innocent being accused of something he did not do, or other stories with wonderful twists and turns. I love surprises, and frequently introduce them in my series.

Q)Have you ever had an experience in your life that you consider paranormal?

A) When my father died, I am certain he visited me three days after his death to assure me he was okay. I also feel his presence under certain circumstances and have had “conversations” with him while driving to work and in dreams. I know it sounds nuts, but there are very strong experiences which I truly believe are “real.” I have never, however, experienced time travel or met a ghost, per se. Once my daughter, Melanie, and I were in a concert hall listening to a piece that was one of my father’s favorites to play on the piano. It was Debussy. I felt my father’s presence so strongly…it was really amazing. My daughter later told me she felt his presence—before I mentioned it. She didn’t know it was one of his favorite pieces, so I am quite convinced he stopped by for a visit with us while all three of us listened to the Debussy!

Q) I believe it was P.D. James who said she created her characters, the setting, the murder weapon, and then the victim. What is your personal writing style?

A) I usually create the setting, the characters, the mystery (victim) and then the weapon, in that order.

Q) Do you outline a book on paper, make voluminous notes, or do you just have a general direction for the story?

A) I have never outlined except after I wrote a book to help create the synopsis. I am a detailed planner in “real” life, but for my stories, I just have a vague idea about themes and twists, and such. Then I let my fingers fly and the characters lead me through the story, frequently changing my original plans.

Q) Like most writers, I imagine there sometimes comes a point when you decide that a particular story just isn’t coming together right. How do you deal with those situations?

A) I’m currently working on revamping an older book I wrote in the LeGarde Mystery series, called Virtuoso. Although I think the plot is fine, the writing is a little stale and in my “older” style before I hit my current skill level. So I’m rewriting the whole thing. It’s going slowly and I’m not enjoying it. But I keep plugging away at it and it will eventually be done.

Q) Do you have a drawer full of half-written MS or topic ideas or notes for characters you’d like to write about some day?

A) I have one file called “ideas for books” that has one-liners about potential plots and plot twists – that’s it. Everything else has come full fruition into a novel. I usually start a book right away when the ideas hit me – and I can’t stop until the novel is completed.

Q) Is it easy for you to keep the plot of one series from impinging on your planning for another?

A) It’s not too hard – my characters are close to my heart and pretty real to me. So they stay unique and distinctly differentiated in my head.

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Book Review: Death Angel


Drea is ready to break with her mob boyfriend, but getting away from him isn’t easy. He sends dangerous assassin Rousseau after her — a man who knows her intimately — and the chase begins.

This book is one of those that impresses me with its sheer audacity. The dark hero assassin is basically cliche in romance, but how often is the assassin’s mission to kill the heroine? And how often does he actually do it?

Dying and coming back to life is enough to convince anyone to turn a new leaf. But will it save Drea from the mob, and from the man who killed her?

Even knowing and loving Linda Howard as I do, I didn’t think she could successfully pull off this romance. She did. IMHO, of course, but she did.

I highly recommend to fans of romantic suspense, and especially to Linda Howard fans.

Suspense Magazine Radio Interview

Did a live interview with Suspense Magazine on Blog Talk Radio today. There are three guests and I’m the last, so skip ahead to the 60 minute mark. Hope I sound okay. My husband says I say “so,” “um,” and other similar fillers a lot. But it was a fun interview and the host was engaging, which makes a big difference!