Into the Dreaming Imaginative Fiction from Author, Editor, and Writing Coach Christine Amsden

Series Review: Haven

I have just finished watching all five seasons of Haven (2011-2015) on Netflix and I recommend it to those who enjoy a paranormal mystery — with a few caveats.

First and foremost: Season 1 was uninspiring. I don’t think I would have finished it except that my 11-year-old son was watching with me, and he was into it. The episodes were episodic, the “troubles” made little sense, and in some cases were truly absurd, and it was hard to believe that the writers had a serious plan for the show.

Then things got rolling!

Seasons 2, 3, and 4 were the true highlights of this series, IMO. Though the shows continued with their episodic nature clear up until the last season, when there was no longer any hope for it, the series arc became clearer, the stakes became higher, more interesting characters and relationships developed, and we began to see that the writers did, in fact, have a plan.

There were even some twists and turns I definitely did not see coming, and that’s high praise indeed, coming from me!

Season 5 brought the show to a complete and satisfying conclusion, although I did begin to feel the drag and thought things might have gone on just a tad longer than they needed to.

It was nice that this show was watchable with my 11-year-old son. There is some kissing and romance (he hid under the blankets during these moments) but it was reasonably tame and it was plot relevant.

All in all, this is good. It’s not going to be on my favorites list, but not everything can be. If you’re looking for something paranormal to watch and you have Netflix, check this out — all 5 seasons are available to watch.

Gourmet Meals in a Box? Home Chef Review

A few years ago I had never heard of them, but now they’re everywhere: Companies willing to deliver everything you need to prepare your own culinary masterpiece.

These companies cater largely to working singles and couples who want to play in the kitchen on the weekend. (Their deliver schedules universally favor weekend chefs.) That is not me. I’m a work-at-home mom with two kids (9 and 12). Sometimes I think I live in the kitchen. I certainly know how to cook, at least to a point. So why did I decide to give this a try?

Put simply, I’m in a rut. I cook the same basic meals on a rotation, and I usually opt for cheap and fast. When I do work up the motivation to try new dishes, especially fancy new dishes, something usually goes wrong: bad recipes abound on the Internet, and high-quality ingredients, when readily available, often sit right next to temptingly cheaper options. Sometimes, they are hard to find at all.

Many of these services advertise a monetary savings compared to the grocery store, but I don’t believe it. Even if you choose the best quality, freshest, organic ingredients, and even if you take into account the ability to scale quantities, I don’t believe there’s a real monetary incentive.

But money is not the only value. Time is of value. Excellent recipes are of value. Confidence in the kitchen is of value. And pushing me out of my comfort zone is of value.

One last note: I am currently trying to lose weight using an intuitive, mindful eating approach. I observe that I am more satisfied when I truly enjoy what I’m eating, so that is an additional value I seek.

With all that in mind, let’s get started!

Home Chef (10-25-17)

My first foray into gourmet meal delivery services was Home Chef, which offered a $30 discount on the first order. Thanks! That did, in fact, help me click “buy.”

Selecting meals was easy. You simply log into their website, choose from a wide selection of choices, and make sure you have your order in place by the Friday before your scheduled delivery date. They had a lot of yummy looking choices, but in the end, I went with their recommendations.

Salmon with Green Goddess sauce was a fantastic dish that the whole family enjoyed. I make salmon at home all the time, and I don’t do half bad at it when I get a good fillet. (This is one of those cases where the quality of the product will make or break the dish.) The zucchini, on the other hand, is something I tend to do boring things with and am usually disappointed by the result. This zucchini was well flavored via white wine and fresh paprika. Roasted potatoes are a staple in this house, but the recipe made these even more convenient to prepare by cleverly starting them in a skillet, then baking them in the oven in a way that had both the salmon and potatoes coming out at the same time. The green goddess sauce was wonderful too, and an easy throw together.

As we ate, we considered the cost of this meal at the grocery store. With the first-week discount, it was clearly cheaper than anything we could have bought. But actually, given the high quality of the ingredients, it would probably be pretty close at full price – in this case. (I do not believe this is true of most of their meals.) Then consider the fact that it came to my door, packed in ice, neatly divided into little pouches, and complete with easy-to-follow instructions … yeah, there’s a value here. It’s definitely a yuppy value, but I grudgingly confess that I qualify.

Acapulco Steak Tacos were good too, although not as good as the salmon. The pico di gallo was the highlight of the dish, a combination of fresh tomatoes, shallots, jalapenos, cilantro, and lime juice that marinated while the steak cooked to let the flavors develop and that created a sort of garden fresh accompaniment to the steak. I did mess up by dobbing sour cream on my first taco, because in my experience, sour cream always goes on tacos. It does not go on these tacos. It obscures the flavors, weakening them.

As a value comparison, it’s a bit harder to justify these tacos. Even fresh and organic, I could purchase these ingredients at about half the cost. The only caveat is that I don’t know what was in the beef marinade. (It came already marinating in something.)

Again, this came with clear, easy-to-follow instructions. I will say that I have tried to make tacos similar to this before and failed. Most recipes say to cut the meat before you cook it and this creates strips of thin, tough meat. This recipe had me cook the steaks then cut it into strips, which worked out much better.

I would probably not order this particular meal again, but I can understand why it is a successful customer favorite and I’m glad I gave it a try.

Environmental Impact

I was a little concerned by the environmental impact of the shipping methods. I’m not sure if anyone does it better, but this si something I plan to look out for. They claimed the ice packs were “recyclable by reusing” but we didn’t need them for anything. There was also a great deal of insulating material that needed to be thrown away, although some of this did go toward our daughter’s egg drop project.

Customization

Number of servings: While you can choose dinners for two, for, or six people, it is worth mentioning that Home Chef packages their meals for two people at a time. They will send you two packages for the four-person plan, and three for the six-person plan.

*The recipes are written for the two-person package.* I had to double the recipe for my four-person family as the enclosed instructions were written for the two-person package, including amounts. If I have one complaint to make about this company, it’s this. For the cost, they should have sent a set of instructions that didn’t require me to do math in my head, detracting from the ease I mentioned above.

Delivery frequency: Shipments must have a $50 value. I had no problem with this requirement, because it would be hard to justify their shipping costs for cheaper deliveries.

They will, however, ship you food less frequently than once a week, if you like the services but maybe can’t afford quite so much every month. They’ll ship them every two weeks, or three, or four, or let you put a pause on your account indefinitely, welcoming you and your money back whenever you’re ready. 🙂

Sustainability: Each dish has a use by date, specified on the web site so you can plan accordingly. The salmon, for instance, needed to be used within three days. The steak tacos within five. You can choose to have your meals delivered on Wednesday, Friday, or Saturday depending upon your needs.

Overall Impressions

I was surprised by how much I liked this program. I’m still having trouble justifying the expense, especially since I’m not exactly the target market for this service. But as much as I try to cook excellent foods, I’m a cook, not a chef. You want meatloaf and mashed potatoes? I got your meatloaf and mashed potatoes. Cookies? I’m awesome at cookies. And nice hearty soups are no problem either.

These meals were things I wouldn’t be upset to be served at a sit-down restaurant. Yes, I still had to cook them, but they were easy and convenient, and created few dishes.

I felt pampered, just a little bit, using this service.

So yeah, I think I could try this again. But I plan to try a different service first, because I’m the kind of girl who likes to shop around. When I finish, there will be a side-by-side comparison.

Next up – Plated!

The Irony of Isolation #HoldOnToTheLight

 

Growing up, I never felt like I fit in. I still don’t. Every day remains a struggle, with that demon we like to call depression whispering lies into my ear.

“You’re a failure.”

“Nobody likes you.”

“You have nothing interesting to say.”

And on and on … these are some of the tamer lies my demon likes to tell. He can get downright nasty, especially when I let myself stop and listen.

“You are alone” is possibly the most insidious lie that depression demons like to tell. It’s horrific because humans are, first and foremost, social animals. Infants deprived of love have died of it, but it doesn’t end there. We continue to need to feel love and connection throughout our lives.

Yet it is a lie. How can we be alone when so many of our demons are telling us precisely the same thing? That’s the irony – that we are not remotely alone in our feelings of isolation.

Writing, for me, began as an escape. I imagined my way out of loneliness, away from the kids on the playground I watched from a distance, and often into outer space where I was a princess with magical powers. (Yes, I’ve always mixed my genres!) Eventually, the escape itself became its own dream – that of becoming a “successful” author.

What a terrible career choice for someone who needs regular infusions of positive reinforcement! I sit around for days, weeks, even months on end without getting any feedback at all, not even in the form of a paycheck. Yet, when I backed away from writing a couple of years ago, I sank into the worst depression I’ve ever experienced in my life. It didn’t help that when I tried to explain my troubles, the reaction was something along the lines of, “You’ve published seven, almost eight books and you think you’re a failure? Oh my God!”

Sorry. Didn’t mean to step over other people’s far worse problems!

But let’s face it: Again, I’m not alone on this. I am not the only writer who feels the disappointment that can only come from a lifetime of hard work meeting lackluster results. I am not the only writer who struggles with infrequent positive reinforcement intermingled with heartbreaking criticism or downright rejection. And I am not the only writer to lose hope, resulting in a lengthy period of burnout.

It wasn’t until I heard the words, “I don’t consider myself a success” coming from a New York published author with over thirty books that I realized how not alone I really was.

Depression and anxiety (another of my demons) are always lying. And like the worst sorts of lies, they tend to be rooted in a kernel of truth. Overcoming them is a daily challenge that begins with a simple truth:

You are not alone.

About the campaign:
#HoldOnToTheLight is a blog campaign encompassing blog posts by fantasy and science fiction authors around the world in an effort to raise awareness around treatment for depression, suicide prevention, domestic violence intervention, PTSD initiatives, bullying prevention and other mental health-related issues. We believe fandom should be supportive, welcoming and inclusive, in the long tradition of fandom taking care of its own. We encourage readers and fans to seek the help they or their loved ones need without shame or embarrassment.

Please consider donating to or volunteering for organizations dedicated to treatment and prevention such as: American Foundation for Suicide Prevention, Hope for the Warriors (PTSD), National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI), Canadian Mental Health Association, MIND (UK), SANE (UK), BeyondBlue (Australia), To Write Love On Her Arms (TWLOHA) and the National Suicide Prevention Hotline.

To find out more about #HoldOnToTheLight, find a list of participating authors and blog posts, or reach a media contact, go to http://www.HoldOnToTheLight.com and join us on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/WeHoldOnToTheLight

Frequency Season 1

Image result for images frequency

I’m going to go out on a limb here and say: Pass on this one.

Frequency is a one-season CW show which originally aired in 2016/20177. It has been cancelled, although it isn’t entirely clear why because despite what I’m about to say, it got a fairly positive audience reception. They apparently released an epilogue to provide closure, which is a decent thing to do although I didn’t feel like it ended on a cliffhanger. The ending barely hinted at more conflict to come.

So why am I not feeling the same positive energy as others on this show?

Logic problems.

Time travel is becoming popular again, which is fine. As a long-time scifi fan I’m intrigued by time travel and have considered its myriad implications. Is time travel all part of a single continuum in which everything that has happened, has already happened, meaning time travelers can’t change the future? Or does every minor change spark a new reality, making it impossible for time travelers to truly find their way home again? How does it work? Why does it work? I’m not talking about quantum physics here; I just want to know that there are rules, that they make sense, and that the show is working within them.

This show begins with an intriguing pilot episode that sets up the rest of the series. A woman, fumbling with her old HAM radio, finds herself talking to her dad 20 years ago. And as they both figure out that this communication is real, she tells him he’s going to die the next day. Forewarned is forearmed and all that, so he survives. But at a cost …

There was a serial killer called the Nightingale who had killed a few women back in 1996 in the original time line. Somehow, when dear dad survives, that all changes — the Nightingale has now been active for 20 years and worse, he’s going to kill her mom in a few months in the 1996 timestreame.

Sounds pretty good, right? I thought so! The race is on to save her mom and mend personal relationships that were also torn asunder by these events. Over the course of the season they follow leads, sometimes changing the timestream more — sometimes with more serious consequences than others.

So the problem, without giving away the ending for those of you who want to try to figure out whodunit, I feel like I need to say that the show never satisfactorily explained the key point:

What changed when dear dad lived? How did his survival cause the dramatic new path for this serial killer?

Not only was this not answered, but it became clear within a few short episodes that it never would be. They forgot, as they chased down this that and the other lead, that this was a TIME TRAVEL story, not just a parallel police procedural running in two different decades. This means that ultimately, even though I did work out who did it, the ending was unsatisfying and senseless. It didn’t help that they paused mid-season for a chat with a crazy prisoner who also claimed to talk to a different time who claimed that you had to “chop it off at the trunk” — ie killing a person was the only way to make real, effective changes in the timelines.

Ummm … clearly not?

I’ve forgiven many a fantasy and scifi series for bungling science now and again, but when a show can’t even stay consistent throughout a single 13-episode series, particularly regarding its defining characteristic, we’re done.

GOLD MEDAL WINNER — Kaitlin’s Tale

Kaitlin’s Tale took the GOLD in the contemporary fantasy category of the 2017 Global Ebook Awards!

The judges at the Global Ebook Awards have been extremely enthusiastic about the Cassie Scot Series. Every book in the series has won a Global Ebook Award. (Some have received other awards as well.) So I’m super excited to announce that Kaitlin’s Tale has joined its companion novels. 🙂

 

Dear Netflix

Dear Netflix:

I thought you were different.

I’ve been an ardent supporter of the Netflix brand almost from the start. Well before on-line viewing became more the norm than the exception. Well before your original content made you a serious threat to cable TV. You created binge watching, everyone’s new favorite way to watch TV. And you gave us shows we couldn’t find anywhere else.

Sense8 was one of those shows.

Look, I’m a businesswoman. I get it. I knew Sense8 was unlikely to get the full 5-season arc the creators seemed to want. It’s an expensive show to make — hugely expensive. And it’s super edgy, although well loved for all that.

But while you can’t fully make business decisions based on emotions, you can’t ignore them either. Businesses who can only see numbers and fail to take into account the human element lose big in the long run. I know you know this, Netflix. All I have to do to understand how well you know this is look at your forward-thinking policies on parental leave. It’s a visionary way to support your employees and help them become happier and more productive.

Customers, too, need to feel supported.

Networks have poisoned their viewership through decades of releasing and retracting shows, often with no warning or closure. It has made the consumer wary of investing in new shows, and it has fueled their decision to head to services like Netflix where they can binge watch a guaranteed number of episodes at a time and where, up until now, even the shows with less popularity regularly got renewed.

Look, I’m not saying that you should renew a show costing $9 million per episode for 3 more years. All I’m saying is this: Give us closure.

Closure could be achieved in a two-hour movie. Or one last season. Or something in between.

Closure will give you something more, too. More than fan satisfaction. It will build trust with your audience.

Trust. Something NBC, ABC, CBS, FOX, and all the other networks lost long ago. It’s the reason I won’t start watching a show on those networks before it’s been out for at least 2, preferably 3 seasons.

Trust isn’t something you can put a price tag on. If you can become the network that will finish things, if at all possible, even if it’s not in the best, most idealistic way, then your audience will expand by leaps and bounds as more and more viewers decide, “What the heck? I’ll give it a try” to every new show that comes along.

I hope you will seriously consider lending closure to the most fantastic TV show ever produced and in so doing, send a message to your viewers that you know TV watching is more than a business to them. It’s an emotional investment.

Sincerely,

A concerned viewer

Travelers Season 1

Canada is once more proving that they’ve got game when it comes to science fiction television shows. This joint Canadian/Netflix venture was an easy binge watch with an instantly hooky premise and a great cast.

So sometime in the future, things are bad. “Travelers” jump back to modern time by rewriting the brain of some poor schmuck who’s about to die anyway … in an accident or some other preventable way. The future depends upon the age of computers to accurately record the places, times, and mechanisms of these deaths. (The answer to the question: “Why don’t you kill Hitler?” which did come up.) Not all travelers land safely. The journey comes with risks, and there is a real chance of dying.

Of course, our five heroes have no problems … at least, no problems arriving. One ends up dealing with his host’s heroine addiction while another learns that her host had a serious mental disability which essentially means she’s going to die (host brain can’t handle it).

They’re on a mission to save the future, and they’re not the only ones here. That’s one of the things I enjoy most about this story: You get a sense of a much bigger pictures and of a carefully orchestrated scheme. We’re only seeing the tip of the iceberg.

I have 1 complaint about this show. It’s something I didn’t fully know how to put into words until the very end of the season, although I sensed something a little off nearly from the start.

We know almost nothing about these characters’ lives before they jumped to the present (their past).

There’s a great deal of story and character development in the here and now, but the fact that we don’t have a solid backstory, or any backstory at all, makes it hard to understand the true stakes of the situation. I know they’re intentionally trying to keep the future murky, but this strategy backfires on someone like me who thrives on character motivation. Why did they risk everything to come back? What did they leave behind? Was any of it good? Who they are is more than who they have become; it began in their past (in the future).

I hope season 2 will address this gaping hole. I definitely plan to watch and find out!

I’d give this a solid 4/5 starts and recommend it to scifi fans.

Sense 8 Season 2

It’s been almost two years since I reviewed “My New Favorite Scifi Series: Sense8” I made no bones about it, I love, love loved this show! I rewatched it 3 times in the summer of 2015, checked daily for news of its renewal, and felt the greatest relief of my life when they announced it had gotten a second season.

Then I waited. And waited some more.

Then came the Christmas Special, which I didn’t love. As I wrote in that review, this isn’t like Doctor Who — it’s not episodic. The characters can’t just go on a stand-alone adventure and in fact, they didn’t. They honestly spun their wheels and made excuses for not taking action for an entire year, even while Wil and Rylie were on the run and in hiding.

It made me nervous. After all this time, was the show not as good as I had first thought? Had I set it on a pedestal too high for it to reach?

I waited some more.

Finally, a week and a half ago, Snese8 season 2 arrived and … I loved it!!!!!

First, don’t think for a second that taking 11 days to watch this show means anything except that I have kids, this show is extremely inappropriate for kids, they go to bed at 9 and I go to bed at 10. That’s one episode per evening, minus game night. Honestly, I watched this show as quickly as it was possible for me to watch!

Unlike the first season, which had a serious warming up period, season 2 got things rolling right away. The clan is in danger from Whispers and from BPO. They’re working together to learn more and to try to free Wil from his heroin-induced stupor (the only thing keeping Whispers out of his head).

Meanwhile, every character has his/her own things going on — Sun is still in prison and her brother is trying to kill her; Lito is suffering the fallout of coming out of the closet; Van Damn has been noticed by reporters and become a symbol of hope for his people; Kala is unhappy with her husband and the things she’s learning about his company; Wolfgang is in the middle of some Berlin crime wars.

The thing that struck me most about season 2 is that the characters had truly become a cluster. 

There are so many things that are awesome about this that it’s hard to separate!

  1. The science fiction of the show is more real this season, more apparent in every scene and in every action, making even the mundane seem more extraordinary.
  2. The pacing is faster because the interconnectivity of the characters is the most interesting part of the show.
  3. The pacing is faster because even when you’re spending time with characters or plots you’re less interested in, you get visits from characters (along with their baggage) you’re more interested in.

Honestly, I can’t say enough good things about the way the show portrayed the worldwide cluster in this season. When a big event took place in any of the characters’ lives, the others were likely to be present, even if they were just watching or partying. Then they might take over at odd moments, bolstering one another and making each one more than they could be alone.

The cinematography was awesome too, of course, just like in season 1. Seamless transitions from Bankok to Seoul to Berlin to San Fransisco to Amsterdam to … they were all over the world! The amount of work that must have gone into making this show is mind-boggling. And it’s beautiful. It’s stunning. It’s worth it! 🙂

Having said all that … 

I do have a few odd complaints about this season. The biggest weakness in season 1 was the beginning, but the biggest weakness in season 2 was the end. Maybe because season 2 started on such a high note, there wasn’t anywhere else to go? But the last episode was my least favorite of the season, which is a huge problem. (Please note: I liked the episode, it was just my least favorite.) I was left feeling, not curious or anxious or excited, but frankly confused and bewildered. The final sequence of events made very little sense to me.

In fact, confusion was something I felt a little too often through this season. 

I watch this with my husband, and I can’t count the number of times I stopped to ask him, “What did s/he just say?” or “Did you follow that?” The BPO mystery was often revealed through a series of back-and-forth conversations, usually involving Nomi and at least one of the others, and I just don’t get it. Even now I don’t get it. I’m going to rewatch soon (from the start of season 1, actually) and maybe I’ll get it then, but it’s frustrating ot me that I didn’t get it the first time.

All of which means that while I still love this show, I’m not sure that I can say I love love love it anymore. It’s gotten knocked down to a 5-star rating from an off-the charts rating. Okay, maybe 5.5 stars! It’s good. You should watch this. 

Haven: Season 1

Haven

4/5 stars

I started watching this show with my 11-year-old son a few weeks ago and we’ve been enjoying it a great deal. He might be enjoying it more than me, but then, a lot of the show’s tropes are fresher for him. 🙂

You’ve got your basic cop/paranormal drama set in a small town in Maine. FBI agent Audrey Parker goes to investigate a suspicious death in the first episode, then stays when she sees a newspaper clipping of a woman who looks eerily like her. Perhaps the mother she never knew?

The paranormal element manifests in a string of strange abilities that various members of the community possess. They call them “troubles” and the people who have them “the troubled.” More often than not, these aren’t good things. People die — often unintentionally. Audrey has to try to find out who’s responsible and help them get their trouble under control.

In my opinion, the first few episodes of the show are tedious. There are also a few head-scratching episodes in there that just don’t make sense. But don’t give up! By the end of the first season, the show develops an arc, begins to demonstrate depth, and develops several intriguing mysteries.

I recommend this show to paranormal/fantasy fans.

Writing 101: Description

To celebrate the launch of my new editing venture, I’m writing a new series of blog posts that take us back to basics. These are the fundamentals of writing, the things you need to know before you’re ready to publish.

DESCRIPTION

For many new writers, and even some experienced writers, description is the bane of their existence. I’m afraid that our English teachers in school didn’t help when they encouraged us to spend a thousand words describing the ceiling. They meant well, and the exercise is not without merit, but seriously, who wants to read a thousand words about the ceiling?

Well, I don’t know … Is it the Sistine Chapel? Are there blood stains on it? Is a ghost floating around up there? Is the ceiling not actually there at all? Has there been a sudden reversal of ground and sky?

What I’m getting at is the key to description. The key to many aspects of writing, for that matter.

RELEVANCE

Description is challenging to new authors for a variety of reasons. For me, it was the fact that I thought it was utterly boring and usually skimmed through it in the books I read, so I wasn’t that thrilled about writing it into my own books. I’m not at all alone in that attitude. For others, for authors who love the art of turning pictures into words, the challenge is wordiness, pacing, and inflicting boredom on readers. Description is something that tends to turn authors into minimalists or maximalists, and you can get some heated debate over which approach is “right” and which is “wrong.”

There is no right. There is no wrong. There is only personal taste and relevance.

In other words, as long as what you are describing is meaningful to your story in some way, then it is up to you, the author, to tell us just enough or to truly create a canvas of words. The risk you run with the “just enough” approach is that the reader will fill in details that you leave out from his/her own experience. The risk you run with the “canvas” approach is that some readers will skim those paragraphs. As a mature writer, I tend to try to split the difference, to aim for the middle, but always with a keen focus on the relevance of every word I write.

As an editor, your personal preference is my top priority, but I will guide you with the concept of relevance in mind. For wordy writers, this means that I might steer you away from describing every last item in a room that turns out to have no bearing on either character or plot. For minimalists, this might mean that I ask you to add description of important people, places, or things that I have trouble imagining without some guidance.

Concerns over quantity of description should always take a backseat to the quality of description. I’m sure you’ve heard the advice to bring in your five senses, and that’s true. You should absolutely do that. But the best description does more than share sights, sounds, smells, tastes, and touches.

The best descriptive sentences move the story.

Wait … doesn’t description slow the story down or even stop it while you provide some relevant scene setting? Sadly, the answer to that question is often yes. This is why I skimmed so much of it as a child and why it took so many years for me to appreciate the wonderful power of a descriptive sentence to do more than one thing, to be more than superficial. Because the truth is, description can do more than BE relevant, it can ADD relevance.

Let me give you an example:

The green chair stood high-backed and proud in a ray of afternoon sunlight that slanted in through a large picture window.

This sentence does a lot to show you the scene. It even does it in the active voice, avoiding being and other passive phrasing. You now know something about the chair, and even what time of day it is. But is that all this sentence can do? Is there any other way in which that moment can mean more? Do more?

Lisa’s favorite green chair stood high-backed and proud in a ray of afternoon sunlight that slanted in through a large picture window.

Hmmm … I changed “the” to “Lisa’s favorite” and look what happened …. now you know something about a character too! What else can we do?

Lisa’s favorite green chair, faded and worn from decades of use and abuse, stood high-backed and proud in a ray of afternoon sunlight that slanted in through a large picture window.

Okay, now we have a bit of history … the history of Lisa and the chair. But I feel like we can take it one step further, to really connect this chair to this person and more, to whatever story is happening around her. Even assuming that I care about Lisa in some way, based on whatever has come before now in the story, right now the chair is nothing more than a prop in her environment.

Lisa’s favorite green chair, faded and worn from decades of use and abuse, stood high-backed and proud in a ray of afternoon sunlight that slanted in through a large picture window. What would happen to that chair tomorrow, when she left her home forever to live out her days in a nursing home? Would one of her kids take it, or would they throw it away like some useless relic that had lived beyond its usefulness?

Now, finally, we have description connected to story, interwoven so tightly that either one without the other would be incomplete. That chair is more than a chair now, it is a symbol of Lisa’s own fears about her future. If you chose, you could go room by room, showing more memories and deepening that emotional bond between Lisa and everything she’s leaving behind. It’s not absolutely necessary, because you’ve already said a lot, but you could. The bigger point is that you make magic happen when your words do double or even triple duty.

Good description stems from relevance; great description creates relevance.